1929 Ford Model A Truck
This 1929 Ford model AA truck is on permanent loan to the museum. The AA version of the Model A has a longer and stronger wheelbase, and lower ratio gearing to enable its 40 HP in-line 4 engine to move 3/4 ton of freight. This lower gearing keeps the vehicle's safe maximum speed to just over 30 MPH. It can go faster for a few moments but sustained high speed will damage the engine and transmission. It is one of our most popular and versatile vehicles. It can be used to provide rides to visitors at the museum and is also an excellent parade vehicle. It has been in the Battle of Flowers and the Fiesta Flambeau so many times it could probably make its own way along the route. It still has its original simple and reliable 40 BHP 4 cylinder engine with a three speed transmission, all around safety glass and four wheel mechanical brakes. This truck was designed for hard work.
1929 Ford Model AA at the depot's loading doors. This Model A truck has a low ratio axle for moving heavy loads.
Tony Planas, the museum's mechanical genius, at the wheel of the1929 Ford Model AA.
TTM manager Hugh Hemphill at the wheel of the 1929 Ford Model A in the Battle of Flowers parade. The theme was The Walton's, as they had a Ford Model A truck.
1929 Ford Model A taking part in the museum's huge annual Christmas event.

1929 Ford Model AA.
1929 Ford Model A in 2007 St. Patrick's Day parade.
Visitors from the Model A club as seen from the 1929 Ford Model A truck.
San Antonio Ford Model A club visiting TTM.

San Antonio Ford Model A club visit to TTM.
Enjoying the ride in the 1929 Ford Model A truck.
1929 Ford Model A at San Pedro Park, 2006.
1929 Ford Model A truck at San Pedro Park for San Antonio Founder's Day 2006.
1929 Ford Model A truck.
1929 Ford Model A truck.
Simple and effective four cylinder engine, 1929 Ford Model A truck.
Gas tank removed from 1929 Ford Model A truck for cleaning.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the gas station.
Pete, Ben and Domingo at the wheels of the 1929 Ford Model AA truck, 1924 Buffalo fire truck and 1928 Durant M2 Coupe.
Visitors enjoying a ride on the 1929 Ford Model AA truck.
Visitors enjoying a ride on the 1929 Ford Model AA truck.
2007 Under Repair
In 2007 a significant amount of work was done on this vehicle courtesy of it's owner, Mrs. Pat Monfrey. In march 2008 new tires, flaps and inner tubes were fitted on the truck for over $1,100.00, thanks again to the generosity of Mrs. Monfrey. It is now ready to continue work for another 80 years.
The 1929 Ford Model AA truck's roof before and after replacement
The 1929 Ford Model A truck's roof before replacement.
The 1929 Ford Model A truck's roof after replacement.
The 1929 Ford Model AA truck located at Texas Transportation Museum is owned by Mrs. Pat Monfrey. It was purchased when she and John, her husband, owned the San Antonio Falstaff Beer distribution company. They bought the vehicle in the 1970s and had it painted as a Falstaff Beer delivery truck for promotional purposes. Pat kept the business going for a few years after John regrettably passed away before deciding to move into a different line of work. It was at this time, in the late 1980s that she gave the vehicle to TTM as a long term loan.
How the truck looked before the work was done
1929 Ford Model AA truck looking tired.
1929 Ford Model AA truck.
1929 Ford Model AA truck needing new roof.
Over the years the truck has been put to great use by the museum. Countless visitors have ridden on it around the museum's grounds. It has also been entered into any number of parades, including the Battle of Flowers, the Flambeau, the King William, Fourth of July, Christmas events. It was probably never more at home, as a green beer truck than in a recent St. Patrick's Day parade where, even in its rather poor condition, it still managed to win a prize!
How the truck looked before the work was done
1929 Ford Model AA truck needing new roof.
1929 Ford Model AA truck needing new roof.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, old roof interior.
By the early 1990s the truck was not being used much. In fact not many of the museum's vehicles were in running condition. The museum was coming out of a very low point in its history but fortunately a new wave of volunteers began to join, all keen to see the museum grow to its full potential. It was recognized that the 1929 Ford Model AA had attributes that would make it a fine working vehicle, both at the museum itself and in parades but there was a serious problem. It's seventy year old flywheel, which is engaged by the starter motor to get the engine going, was missing several vital teeth. If the engine stopped with the flywheel in a certain position, it was very difficult to start the engine. Fortunately, our good friends at SMT Truck Lines volunteered to help. They took the truck and set about looking for a flywheel for the antique vehicle. One was found in faraway China. It was ordered and delivered a month or so later. Once fitted, the truck started each time every time. SMT also did some other work, such as replace spark plugs, and other items. By the time it was returned to TTM, it was back in business.
How the truck looked before the work was done
1929 Ford Model AA truck still charming enough to win prized despite poor roof, Spring 2007.
1929 Ford Model AA truck on the way to Ray's Model A Repairs, Summer 2007.
1929 Ford Model AA truck on the way to Ray's Model A Repairs, Summer 2007.
By the end of the 1990s another serious problem emerged, one museum volunteers decided to tackle in house. The interior of the fuel tank had become badly corroded, which meant the fuel line was constantly becoming clogged with rust flakes. No shop would touch the vehicle so we set about removing the tank ourselves. (See picture on main automobile page on this site.) After we cleaned it out we used a commercially available cleaner and rust inhibitor. Reinstalling the tank, which is located between the cab and the engine, proved to be even more difficult than removing it but we got it done. We try to make sure the tank is kept full to help prevent more rust forming from condensation. We also installed a modern in-line fuel filter inside the cab, which does a better job than the original glass style one under the hood which relies on gravity alone. The new filter allows the driver to see what is wrong from within the cab and can be switched out in less than two minutes if necessary.
Repairs under way
1929 Ford Model AA truck, roof removed at Ray's shop.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, roof removed at Ray's shop.
1929 Ford Model AA truck wooden roof kit.

1929 Ford Model AA truck exposed rear axle and wheel hubs.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, rear wheel bearing.
Although we did our best to keep the vehicle in good condition, performing not only work needed to keep it running, like replacing batteries and spark plugs, we also tried to keep the vehicle looking its best by removing the classic instrument panel and fixing it up. We installed a fuel gauge which works with a thin metal rod and a cork which floats in the gasoline. If the tank is over full, gas actually sloshes to the gauge which is what took the paint off the front in the first place. We tried to get a cable to activate the speedometer and odometer, which we knew worked, but could not find one that fitted the AA truck, which needs a longer one than a regular Model A.
Ray's Model A Repairs, Restoration and Parts
1929 Ford Model AA truck in Ray's shop. Note new roof.
1929 Ford Model AA truck in Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
Vehicle at Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
1929 Ford Model AA truck in Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
Our major concern was the terrible condition of the roof. This is entirely supported by a wooden frame which had become rotten. It was around this time, early 2000, that we first heard about and met Ray, of Ray's Model A Repairs. Even he was reluctant to do the work at that time as a correct kit was not yet commercially available and the cost of hand making all the wooden pieces would have been astronomical. Fortunately a kit has subsequently come onto the market, as appreciation for the trucks as well as the coupes, sedans and convertibles has grown in the last few years, making the supply of parts for AA's a lot easier to find and less expensive.
Ray's Model A Repairs, Restoration and Parts
Vehicle at Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
Vehicle at Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
Vehicle at Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
Vehicle at Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
In all this time, the museum had not heard much from Mrs. Monfrey, who had moved to Houston. Current museum manager Hugh Hemphill, then museum board chairman, who had been involved in a good deal of the work to keep the truck in the best shape possible, was able to track her down and contact her. A series of pleasant communications followed about the truck. Pictures of it in parades and other events, like the Christmas Extravaganza at the museum, or at the San Antonio Founders Day event, held in San Pedro Park were sent to her on a regular basis. It was hard to hide the state of the roof and Mrs. Monfrey decided it would be in the best interests of the longevity of the vehicle if it was replaced and volunteered to do so in the Spring of 2007.
Ray's Model A Repairs, Restoration and Parts
Vehicle at Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
Vehicle at Ray's Model A Repairs, main shop.
Ray's Model A Repairs engine test bed.
Ray's Model A Repairs, another satisfied customer.
Ray was contacted and pictures of the truck were sent to him. He decided he could do the work and tracked down the various kits that would be needed, as the parts for the roof and the visor are sold separately, and the vehicle would need both. Once these arrived, the old looking truck was loaded onto a trailer and pulled over to Ray's place. It is worth mentioning the truck would hardly get up to 30 MPH and even then it would be straining. As such, driving it to Ray's was not a feasible option. One long term volunteer mentioned it used to go 40 MPH quite easily, despite it's low ratio, heavy duty rear end and transmission, designed to haul heavy loads, not for speed.
Ray's Model A Repairs, Restoration and Parts
Ray's Model A Repairs keeps a lot of the local club's cars healthy.
Ray of Ray's Model A Repairs in our truck. Note new roof.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. Ray of Ray's Model A Repairs with our truck.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. Ray of Ray's Model A Repairs with TTM Manager, Hugh Hemphill.
While the roof was the main focus of the exercise, Mrs. Monfrey agreed to a small amount of extra work. This included fixing the parking brake, getting the brake lights to work again, and replacing the headlight surrounds which has lost their old nickel plate "chrome" a long time ago. It should be mentioned right now that Ray is absolutely meticulous about his work, as befits a retired US Air Force jet engine master mechanic. If the work he performed on F4 Phantoms over Vietnam and Germany was not perfect, the planes just might fall out of the sky. Ray brings this same attention to detail and perfectionism to each and every Model A that comes into his shop and ours would be no different. Ray opened his shop in 1971 and has kept very busy without ever having to advertise his services. He relies on word of mouth and his reputation is extremely good. We were lucky he agreed to take on our truck. Soon enough he began to find more and more items he thought we should be aware of. Mrs. Monfrey, who cares a great deal about the truck, agreed to take care of just about everything Ray suggested. The vehicle just might never be so lucky to be in such good hands again.
Our 1929 Ford Model A Truck on its way home
1929 Ford Model AA truck. Ray of Ray's Model A Repairs, truck side view.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. Front end with new roof, headlights surrounds, gas and radiator caps and bumper plates.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. Loading onto trailer going back to Texas Transportation Museum.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. TTM member Dave S. tyin' 'er down.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. Antique and modern Ford trucks.
The work to remove the roof was actually done at Ray's place by museum manager Hugh Hemphill. He also did a certain amount of transportation duties, taking parts to San Antonio Brake & Clutch downtown, to save Ray the effort. Ray did all the rest, which was a lot. The roof kit, fortunately made of wood, did not fit at all well, as it is a one size fits all for both the 27/28/29 types and the 30/31 which have significant differences, if you are talking about fitting a kit onto them. Ray had to painstakingly size all the parts, no men feat when you understand all the holes are pre-drilled, so changing anything could affect how other parts might align. The visor kit was easier but the original metal frame had surface rust all over it, so it had to be cleaned and re-painted. Then we started into the more difficult stuff!
Back at Texas Transportation Museum
1929 Ford Model AA truck, front detail.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, side view.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, rear view.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, rear view.
When the truck first arrived at his place, Ray went through it, just to check it out. He soon began finding things that he thought really should be done. The webbing under the hood at the radiator and fire wall was completely worn away, making the truck much noisier than it needed to be as well as reducing the life expectancy of the engine covers. More importantly he noticed the original water pump belt pulley, which was constructed of two parts, had broken apart, causing unnecessary vibrations and potential damage to the motor. Replacing this would involve tipping the engine up, as the pulley sits in a special cutaway in the chassis. This also provided an opportunity to replace the motor mounts. Tipping the engine also meant removing the radiator completely. It was at this time he found that the bottom radiator pipe was found to be badly corroded and in imminent danger of failure.
Details of the new roof in our 1929 Ford Model A Truck
1929 Ford Model AA truck, roof detail.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, roof detail.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, roof detail.
And so it went on. Taking the drums off to fix the parking brakes was a nightmare. These, like many items on the vehicles, may not have been removed since the vehicle was built in 1929. Ray rebuilt the carburetor and tuned the engine. He fixed the choke and fuel mixture control, which is on a long rod on the passenger side. He cleaned up the gear lever connections on the cab floor. He fixed the starter motor actuator rod, which had bad habit of coming off from all the vibrations as the vehicle was being driven. New radiator and gas caps were installed to compliment the spiffy new headlight surrounds. Ray noticed the doors were sagging badly. He re-hung them and then built up the striker plates which had become badly worn to ensure the doors stayed properly closed now they were back in the right place. New chrome pieces were fitted on the door opening rods.
Details of the new roof in our 1929 Ford Model A Truck
1929 Ford Model AA truck. You might say they rear view on this truck is a little occluded.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, rear axle and drum.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, heavy duty rear spring.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, front wheel drum.
Altogether, with delays as esoteric parts were ordered or taken out for outside work, the truck was at Ray's place for almost six weeks. So many small, seemingly insignificant details were attended to, it's hard to list them all. When he had the front window removed, he replaced the weather stripping around it. He cleaned up the brass rods that keep it open for ventilation. he installed correct side window guides as the old ones were completely gone on one side and barely hanging on on the other. He removed a generic starter switch which placed live electrical wires dangerously close to the fuel tank. He installed a correct cable from the transmission to the odometer and speedometer, bringing them back into service. In all of this he was consistently polite and positive. It would pain him to see something incorrect that he could fix. We were indeed lucky to obtain his services.
Details of the new roof in our 1929 Ford Model A Truck
1929 Ford Model AA truck, front end.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, head lights.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, hood with new caps.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, roof detail.
The museum also does not underestimate Mrs. Monfrey's generosity. We are so lucky to have the truck in the first place, but to have Pat come forward to provide the financial support to return it to excellent running condition and to improve its appearance is quite extraordinary. TTM is far from being a wealthy museum. We have seen our financial situation stabilize and improve significantly over the last few years but, even so, it would have been some time before we would have been in a position to allocate so large a chunk of our all too stretched resources to any vehicle, even one we appreciate and use as much as we do this one. In doing so, we hope we are honoring the memory of John Monfrey, whose idea it was to acquire the vehicle in the 1970s. We run it in the same parades and events that he did. In the course of any given year it is seen by thousands of people. A good number even get to ride on it, experiencing an older form of transportation in a very real way that is impossible to duplicate.
Details of the new roof in our 1929 Ford Model A Truck
1929 Ford Model AA truck, radiator and gas caps.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. New door release caps. New window guide felt and door retention straps were also installed in 2007.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, cab interior.
1929 Ford Model AA truck. Following 2007 repairs, the parking brake works, the shifting action is improved, a new ignition was installed, the speedometer and odometer now work, a "dummy" horn and light switch was installed, the choke rod was tightened as was the starter actuator rod. Looks can be misleading!.
If we had known how well the truck would drive after ray had finished with it we would probably have simply driven it back to the museum. It drives so much more smoothly and quietly. It also cruises quite happily at 35 MPH. It can go faster, to around 45 MPH, but you definitely get the impression that you are pushing it. That additional power is for hauling heavy loads, not driving fast. The future of the truck is now looking as good as its wonderful new roof. As the vehicle spends most of its time indoors, we hope it will be a long, long time before anyone has to think about replacing it, maybe another eighty years. When that happens, we hope the truck is still at TTM, delighting visitors and parade goers. We also hope those folks in the future are lucky to find someone as skilled as Ray to do the work and as generous as Mrs. Monfrey to help pay for the considerable cost involved.
Our 1929 Ford Model A Truck back in business
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the gas station.
1929 Ford Model AA truck, 1924 Buffalo fire truck and 1928 Durant M2 Coupe.
1929 Model AA truck with new tires, March 2008.
1929 Ford Model AA truck.
1924 Ford Model TT & 1929 Ford Model AA trucks.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the Longhorn & Western railroad depot.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the 2008 St. Patrick's day parade.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the 2008 Shooting Star Museum Bluebonnet Festival.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the 2008 Shooting Star Museum Bluebonnet Festival.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the 2008 Shooting Star Museum Bluebonnet Festival.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the 2008 Shooting Star Museum Bluebonnet Festival.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at former Missouri Pacific railroad station.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at former Missouri Pacific railroad station.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at Sunset Station the former Southern Pacific railroad depot in San Antonio
1929 Ford Model AA truck at Sunset Station the former Southern Pacific railroad depot in San Antonio
1929 Ford Model AA truck at Sunset Station the former Southern Pacific railroad depot in San Antonio
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the Alamo
In 2010 it was decided to replace the old bed rail, which had begun to look very tired. The new, lighter bed rail is lighter, more attractive and makes the truck an even better parade vehicle. Our thanks to Bill Foster and Zip Zepeda for their phenomenal craftsmanship.
1929 Ford Model AA at the San Antonio River.
1929 Ford Model AA at "Lacy Veronica Underwood" independent movie shoot, January 2011.
1929 Ford Model AA at "Lacy Veronica Underwood" independent movie shoot, January 2011.
1929 Ford Model AA at "Lacy Veronica Underwood" independent movie shoot, January 2011.

Bill Todt with two cans of Falstaff beer he drank when he was sixteen and turned into bookends.
Two cans antique cans of Falstaff beer on a Falstaff beer truck.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the Shriner charity car show, June 2011.
1929 Ford Model AA truck at the Shriner charity car show, June 2011.
1929 Ford Model A truck, October 2011.
1929 Ford Model A truck, along with two other Model As, at the 2012 Tejeda Middle School History Faire.
School kids with TTM's 1929 Ford Model A truck at the 2012 Tejeda Middle School History Faire.
"Mariachi Los Soberanos" with TTM's 1929 Ford Model A truck at the 2012 Tejeda Middle School History Faire. The group has a Facebook page and can be contacted at (210) 683-2713
1929 Ford Model AA truck with one of the Union Pacific's heritage trains at Sunset Station, April 2012

1929 Ford Model A decorated by the "San Antonio Military / Civilian Club" for the 2012 Battle of Flowers parade
1929 Ford Model A decorated by the "San Antonio Conservation Society" for the 2012 King William parade
1929 Ford Model A with Model As belonging to members of San Antonio's Ford Model A Club, the "Alamo As," at the 2012 International Ford Model A celebration at Jordan Ford
First trip outside San Antonio under its own power in almost 30 years
In November 2012, the 1929 Ford Model AA truck was driven outside the city limits of San Antonio for the first time in at least 30 years to attend a vintage aircraft Fly-In at Kingsbury Aerodrome, just over 46 miles from the museum. A safe route, mainly along HWY 78 was used. The old truck ran perfectly, cruising along happily at almost 35 MPH. For grins a few snaps were taken in Seguin, to mark the occasion.
1929 Ford Model A at Kingsbury Aerodrome, November 2012
1929 Ford Model A at Kingsbury Aerodrome, November 2012
1929 Ford Model A at Kingsbury Aerodrome, November 2012

1929 Ford Model A at the Guadalupe County court house in Seguin, Texas, November 2012
1929 Ford Model A at the Texas theater in Seguin, Texas, November 2012
1929 Ford Model A in Marion, Texas, November 2012. The large flag was draped over a building being restored in honor of Veteran's Day
More snaps of the 1929 Ford Model A
1929 Ford Model A during "Santa's Railroad Wonderland" 2012
1929 Ford Model A during "Santa's Railroad Wonderland" 2012
1929 Ford Model A on Alamo Plaza, Jan. 1, 2013
1929 Ford Model A at the 2013 Battle of Flowers parade
Drivers seat view from the 1929 Ford Model A during the 2013 Battle of Flowers parade
1929 Ford Model A at the 2013 Flambeau parade
1929 Ford Model A at the International Ford Model A Show at Northside Ford, Septemeber 2013
1929 Ford Model A at the International Ford Model A Show at Northside Ford, Septemeber 2013
1929 Ford Model A picking up museum supplies at Home Depot, Septemeber 2013
1929 Ford Model A in the 2014 'Battle of Flowers' Fiesta parade
1929 Ford Model A in the 2014 'King William' Fiesta parade
1929 Ford Model A in the 2014 'Flambeau' Fiesta parade
1929 Ford Model A at Mission Espada, July 2014
1929 Ford Model A at Mission San Juan, July 2014
1929 Ford Model A at Mission San Jose, July 2014
1929 Ford Model A at Mission Concepcion, July 2014
1929 Ford Model A on a tour of San Antonio's historic missions, August 2014
1929 Ford Model A on a tour of San Antonio's historic missions, August 2014
1929 Ford Model A on a tour of San Antonio's historic missions, August 2014
1929 Ford Model A on a tour of San Antonio's historic missions, August 2014
Another Falstaff Beer Ford Model A truck in San Antonio
1929 Ford Model AA truck in long term storage at Pearl Brewery, San Antonio, April 2013
1929 Ford Model AA truck in long term storage at Pearl Brewery, San Antonio, April 2013
Amazingly enough, there is a second Ford Model AA truck pianted in Falstaff Beer livery in San Antonio. It has been hidden away within a deep recess of the old Pearl Brewery complex near down town. These snaps were taken in April 2013. The vehicle, though deep in dust, sems complete. The biggest diiference bewteen this and TTM's vehicle are the wheels. This one has wire spokes while TTM's has solid steel wheels.
For information about renting this vehicle,
see "Vehicle Rentals" under Related Links
TTM is a registered 501(c)(3) charity

11731 Wetmore Road
San Antonio, Texas 78247
(210) 490-3554
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Friday: 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
(No admittance after 2:00 PM)

Sat & Sun: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
(No admittance after 3:30 PM)

Allow at least 90 minutes to see the
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Technical Specifications
Year:
1929
Make:
Ford
Model:
Model AA
Body Style:
1 Ton Flatbed Truck with Metal Cab
Engine:
4 Cylinder, 200.5 cubic inch, 24 HP, 40 BHP
Transmission:
3-Speed manual with reverse, geared lower than regular Model As
Drive:
Rear wheels
Top Speed:
33 mph
Wheel Base:
131.5 inches
(Regular Model As have a 103 inch wheel base)
Length:
206 inches
(17 feet, 2 inches)
Width:
68 inches (5 feet, 8 inches)
Weight:
3,784 lbs
Wheels:
20 inch, heavy duty steel
Brakes:
4 wheel mechanical drums
Electrical System:
6-volt
Start System:
Electric starter motor
Features:
Speedometer, gas gauge and odometer. Instrument cluster light. Windshield hinged at top for ventilation. Bench seat. Heavy duty rear springs. Hand crank windows.
Additions:
Motometer (Radiator cap mounted temperature gauge)
Production:
130,608 Ford Model AAs (1,515,100 Model As of all kings were sold in 1929)
Original Price:
$475 ($6,000 in today's money)
Status:
Driven frequently on and off museum property