1924 Ford Model T Truck
This 1924 Ford Model TT is sponsored by
This vehicle is the heavy duty truck version of the Model T called the Model TT. Introduced in 1917, the Model TT was the only major variant of the Model T. TT's have a longer and stronger chassis and lower gear ratios to enable the standard Model T 20 HP engine to move one ton of freight. This vehicle also has a factory made cab. Prior to 1924, Ford only sold a rolling chassis. It was left to local manufacturers to build the cabs and beds, which is why there is such a variety of different styles to be seen on remaining examples. This vehicle also features one of the very few Ford approved aftermarket adaptations, a Ruckstell "underdrive" which made it easier for the vehicle to haul heavy loads over very poor roads and up hills. It allowed a top speed of 22 MPH. A regular TT only made 17 MPH while standard cars and runabouts, the light duty truck we now know as pick-ups, could zoom along at 35 MPH.
1924 Ford Model TT Cab Truck with Christmas presents in the back.
1924 Ford Model TT Cab Interior.
Model T's were not small.

1924 Ford Model T Truck front view
1924 Ford Model TT.
1924 Ford Model TT Truck with a really old farm wagon bed on the back.
As mentioned, the TT has a longer wheelbase than the regular T, 125 inches compared with 100. When introduced in 1917 as a rolling chassis only, with neither cab nor bed, the TT cost around $600.00 with another $100 or so for a custom made body by a local builder. ($100 in 1917 is the equivalent of $1,620 today.) By 1924, the cost of a new TT had fallen to around $400. To stimulate sales Ford introduced its first factory made cab. Known as the C cab, it was only made for two years. Ford also introduced its first factory built bed for the rear of the truck. This was quite small and many people, including the folks who owned this vehicle, declined to buy them or removed them immediately for something bigger. The bed on this truck looks as if it could have come straight off an old horse drawn wagon, which was quite common. Today, what ever else you can say about it, it certainly has the patina of age.
The wheel base of the TT truck is longer than a regular T.
Heavy duty Ruckstell rear end on 1924 Ford Model TT truck.
1924 Ford Model TT heavy duty one ton truck.
Front & rear Model TT wheels.
The TT was introduced in 1917. 39,000 Ford Model TT trucks were used by Allied forces during World War One, many as ambulances. The TT was Ford's acknowledgment of the long standing use of Model T's for commercial uses. Indeed the company continued to sell regular vehicle as a rolling chassis as well.
1924 Ford Model TT, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT, June 2008.
Another distinguishing feature of the TT are its wheels. Its wheels have shorter, stouter, spokes and a wider rim to accommodate stronger tires than the high narrow wheels on regular Model T's. The spokes on the front wheels are slightly longer and thinner than those on the rear which has a different, stronger inflatable tire to handle most of the weight. This was step up from the old days when most trucks had solid rubber at the back.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
Other than that, this old truck is almost as stripped as the day it left the factory. It's only gauge is a voltmeter. There is no speedometer or fuel gauge. You check fuel by dipping a measuring stick into the tank located under the seats. It does not even have a dip stick. You check the oil by opening to valves under the cab. It does have factory installed electric lights, horn and starter. We have added a "motometer" or radiator cap mounted engine temperature gauge plus a period correct rear view mirror and brake lights for safety. When it was new it would have been possible to acquire an after market set of side curtains to protect the occupants from the worst of the weather through the nonexistent side windows.
Restoration to working condition
On September 22, 2007 work began to return this long stationary Ford Model T truck to active duty. Daniel Bratcher and Mike Mackechney of the local San Antonio Model T club, the "T Fords of Texas," began what would be a year long process to get it running again. With the application of time, money and effort the truck was ready for prime time by June of 2008. It was driven to and from the Folklife Festival at the Institute of Texan Culture on Durango without incident. It has since become one of the most frequently driven museum vehicles, as the following pictures demonstrate.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck. Vice-Chairman Mike Hitzfelder checks it out.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck. TTM Chairman Pat Halpin.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck. Museum manager Hugh Hemphill.

1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck and 1926 Ford Model T enclosed sedan with Leo, Dave, John, Mingo, John and Jarret.
1924 Ford Model TT - heavy duty truck and 1926 Ford Model T enclosed sedan.
Out and About Under its Own Power
On September 22, 2007 Daniel and Mike of the "Ford T's. of Texas" swung by in a 1926 Ford Model T light pick-up and a 1926 Ford Model T open sedan with the intent of getting the museum's 1924 Ford Model TT truck running again. They removed the incorrect Ford Model A carburetor and modified inlet manifold and replaced them with proper Model T parts. They replaced the spark plugs and wires. They cleaned some light corrosion of some electrical parts, drained the oil and performed some other light but important tasks. They drained out the old oil, put water in the radiator, some gas in the tank, installed a battery and lo and behold the old truck fired on the first stomp of the starter button and started on the second attempt. After tinkering some more, it was decided to see if the truck's transmission was capable of moving the truck. One thing led to another and, even though the carburetor was not properly hooked up and the brakes were questionable at best, before you knew it the truck was out on the museum's grounds, moving under its own power. Though much more work needed to be done, everyone involved was pretty elated at the level of success on the first day.
Daniel and Mike of "T Fords of Texas" working on TTM's 1924 Ford Model TT truck on September 22, 2007.
Daniel and Mike of "T Fords of Texas" working on TTM's 1924 Ford Model TT truck on September 22, 2007.
Our 1924 Ford Model TT truck running again on September 22, 2007.

Our 1924 Ford Model TT truck running again on September 22, 2007.
Our 1924 Ford Model TT truck running again on September 22, 2007.
Our 1924 Ford Model TT truck running again on September 22, 2007.
In early June 2008, after far more work and expense than anyone anticipated, the vehicle finally made its debut on the public roads of San Antonio and drove like a thoroughbred champion! With its Ruckstell rear end in "high," the old truck is only capable of going around 20 MPH. Since September 2007 it had been in and out of the shop for a whole host of necessary repairs. The source of a horrible noise coming from the engine was found to be a metric thread nut that somehow made its way into the oil pan. It came loose from the sediment after the engine warmed up. The front end was stripped as well. Removing some of the bearings was as feat in and of itself because apparently the last person to touch them was the factory employee who fitted them in 1924. The last piece of the puzzle was the electrical system. The engine might run but not very well. Museum members Tony and Hugh took everything out to check and clean all the contacts and trouble shoot the system. Once everything was hooked back up he engine sounded great. Now the truck can go to high ratio without stalling. The biggest kick was when the Ruckstell was put into high and everything still worked. And, it was found, this old T can scoot right along!
More Work - It Never Ends!
There is no such thing as a trouble free Model T. They require almost constant attention. Much of the stuff you find on more modern vehicles is designed to prevent this. constant need for tinkering and adjustments. What you find under the hood of any Model T is the absolute bare minimum required to achieve horseless progress. these vehicles lack fuel, oil and water pumps, for example. And not because they had not been invented but because maintaining them was most likely beyond the scope of the average farmer who had to be be to be self reliant simply because there were no options. The manuals which came with these vehicles were almost wordless, a recognition that illiteracy was more common than not before World War One. With this rugged simplicity came the fact that the vehicle was either set up just right or it wouldn't run worth a hoot. But fixing them, with the most basic of tools, would come easily to most farmers, who were used to fixing the other agricultural equipment on the farm. Fixing a T is surprisingly intuitive, once you forget about all the "extra" stuff on today's cars and trucks.
1924 Ford Model TT at Daisy Tours shop.
1924 Ford Model TT engine upside down on stand.
1924 Ford Model TT motor showing transmission bands.
1924 Ford Model TT magneto piece showing wear.
1924 Ford Model TT motor showing transmission bands.

1924 Ford Model TT returning to Texas Transportation Museum.
1924 Ford Model TT electrical issues.
1924 Ford Model TT, June 2008.
TTM's 1929 Ford Model AA & 1924 Ford Model TT trucks.

1924 Ford Model TT on the road, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT on the road, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT on the road, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT meets new car, June 2008.
Public Debut - June 2008
Finally, just in time for one of the biggest public events in the San Antonio calendar, the Folklife Festival at the Institute of Texan Cultures, held in the middle of June every year, our 1924 Ford Model TT was ready for prime time. Almost. The truck was unable to make it on the downtown cruise with other Model T's. during TTM's "Model T's. @ TTM" show in May though it was on display. Following that the final work to make it ready was completed except for one important element, the tires. Their deteriorated state became unavoidable during a trial run around the block, a ten mile jaunt that is quite taxing for old cars, with some long hills and plenty of traffic lights. An attempt to use some other Model T rims and tires failed as this truck uses an unusual size but fortunately, in the nick of time, we found someone in town who had a pair of the correct front tires and a company willing to fit them. (The rear tire aren't good but they had to suffice because none could be found in town.) Once fitted, and this is a short phrase for a lengthy process, the truck was taken out for another reliability run and this time it ran even better. What a difference the new rubber made. So, we were off to the races. Or, more accurately, the Folklife Festival. The truck made the trip downtown pretty well and was seen by tens of thousands of people. However, it was on the trip back to the museum, past the Alamo, as light was falling, virtually all the way up hill, that the old TT really showed its mettle. The more this truck is driven, the better it seems to run. Also, the driver gains experience and can get a better performance. The truck threw off its reserve and took those hills in its stride. Now we can't wait for its next adventure.
1924 Ford Model TT at the Folklife Festival, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT at the Folklife Festival, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model TT at the Folklife Festival, June 2008.
1924 Ford Model T truck at the Alamo, June 2008.
Ongoing Activity
After sitting idle for almost thirty years, it was to be expected that the vehicle would experience technical difficulties. These were so capricious that it earned the name "Diva" for its ability to run perfectly well in private but to act up once it was about to be in public. Nonetheless, as you can see in the pictures below, it has become one of the most frequently used vehicles at the museum. It took part in its first parade in the St. Patrick's Day celebrations in March 2009. It then took part in the downtown cruise past the Alamo during the 2009 San Antonio Ford Model T show which has become an annual fixture in the museum's calendar. With its bed repainted in its original colors, it has been driven as far as La Verania and Floresville for parades and car shows. It has been drive around San Antonio's historic missions and taken by trailer for a movie shoot in Asherton, Texas. Watch this space for more pictures of its latest exploits.
The 1924 Ford Model TT at Various Events.
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab truck St. Patrick's Day parade, San Antonio 2009.
1924 Ford Model T truck driving past the Alamo during the 2009 San Antonio Ford Model T show put on by the Texas Transportation Museum and the "T Fords of Texas" San Antonio's Model T club.
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab truck
La Verania Lion's Club parade, 2009.
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab truck
La Verania Lion's Club parade, 2009.

1924 Ford Model TT C Cab truck
Caught in heavy rain in St. Hedwig, Texas, 2009
1924 Ford Model TT truck at Mission San Jose, San Antonio
1924 Model TT truck in the 2010 Fiesta Flambeau Parade.
1924 Model TT truck in the 2010 Fiesta Flambeau Parade.

Special Olympics athletes in trailer towed by TTM's 1924 Model TT Truck in the 2010 Fiesta Flambeau parade.
1924 Ford Model TT truck in Asherton, Texas.
1924 Ford Model TT truck at Mission San Juan, San Antonio, Texas.
1924 Ford Model TT truck at Mission San Jose, San Antonio, Texas.

1924 Ford Model T C Cab truck at the Shriner Car Show, November 2010.
1924 Ford Model T C Cab truck at the Tejeda Middle School History Faire, April 2011.
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab truck and 1925 Ford Model TT truck in Brackenridge Park, April 2011.
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab Truck.

1924 Ford Model TT Truck at Wonderland of the Americas Mall, May 2011.
Red McCombs and TTM Manager Hugh Hemphill in front of 1924 Ford Model TT truck.
1924 Ford Model TT at Red McCombs IH-10 Ford dealership.
1924 Ford Model TT at Sunset Station, San Antonio.

1924 Ford Model TT with Southern Pacific 794 steam locomotive.
1924 Ford Model TT at Lubianski Feed Store, St. Hedwig.
Nail stops play on road to Floresville.
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab at Floresville Railroad Depot - June 2011.
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab at Tri-County Tractor Pull & BBQ show, Floresville, TX - June 2011.
"T Fords of Texas" Model T's at the Wilson County court house, Floresville, TX - June 2011.
TTTM's 1924 Ford Model T truck at the San Antonio Christmas tree on Alamo Plaza, January 1, 2012
1924 Ford Model T truck at the Texas Transportation Museum railroad tracks, January 1, 2012
1924 Ford Model T truck hard at work towing a trailer to haul cut brush at the museum
TTM's1924 Ford Model T truck with two other Model Ts at a "Roaring 20s" theme fashion shoot at the Lambermont mansion in San Antonio, March 2012
TTM's1924 Ford Model T truck at a "Roaring 20s" theme fashion shoot at the Lambermont mansion in San Antonio, March 2012
1924 Ford Model T truck with bluebonnets at the museum's gate, spring 2012

1924 Ford Model TT C Cab with a Union Pacific heritage fleet train at Sunset Station, April 2012
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab with a Union Pacific heritage fleet train at Sunset Station, April 2012
1924 Ford Model TT C Cab at Sunset Station, April 2012
Union Pacific train passing TTM's 1924 Ford Model TT C Cab at Sunset Station, May 2012
KSAT 12 interview being filmed in formt of TTM's 1924 Ford Model TT C Cab during National Train Day at at Sunset Station, May 2012
1924 Ford Model T truck at work, Dec. 2012
1924 Ford Model T truck at work, Dec. 2012
1924 Ford Model T during "Santa's Railroad Wonderland," Dec. 2012
1924 Ford Model T truck during "Santa's Railroad Wonderland," Dec. 2012
1924 Ford Model T, Jan 2013
1924 Ford Model T at the Longhorn & Western RR depot, Jan 2013
1924 Ford Model T with singing cowboy during a February 2013 Model T club event. Feb. 2013
1924 Ford Model TT at a low budget documentary shoot, Feb. 2013
1924 Ford Model TT on Broadway, April 2013
1924 Ford Model TT in Brackenridge Park, May 2013
1924 Ford Model TT at Mission Concepcion in San Antonio, August 2013
1924 Ford Model TT at a mysterious, somewhat abandoned "castle" in San Antonio, August 2013
1924 Ford Model TT at the Alamo in San Antonio, August 2013
Young visitor enjoying the 1924 Ford Model TT, October 2013
1924 Ford Model TT as a Christmas prop, December 2013
1924 Ford Model TT at the SAS Shoe Factory in San Antonio, December 2013
1924 Ford Model TT decorated for Christmas, December 2013
1924 Ford Model TT with locomotives in the background, March 2014
For information about renting this vehicle,
see "Vehicle Rentals" under Related Links
TTM is a registered 501(c)(3) charity

11731 Wetmore Road
San Antonio, Texas 78247
(210) 490-3554
Find Us on Google Maps

Friday: 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
(No admittance after 2:00 PM)

Sat & Sun: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM
(No admittance after 3:30 PM)

Allow at least 90 minutes to see the
entire museum and ride the train

Train Schedule
Friday
No Scheduled Train Rides

Saturday & Sunday

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Unlimited Train Rides w/ Admission


Admission & General Information
We accept:
TTM Special Events
Click links for more information
Online Offers
TTM's Lionel O27/O Boxcar
Limited Edition of 500! Order Today!

Click for more information
Related Links
Videos
Video shot and edited by TTM member John Stabe of this 1924 Ford Model TT being driven near the museum.
Technical Specifications
Year:
1924
Make:
Ford
Model:
Model TT 1 ton truck. TTs had longer, stronger chassis with lower gear ratios
Body Style:
C Cab
Engine:
4 Cylinder, 177 cubic inch, (2.9 L) capable of 20 HP at 1,600 rpm
Transmission:
2-Speed planetary fitted with a Ruckstell 2-Speed underdrive
Drive:
Rear wheels via low ratio worm gear rear end
Top Speed:
24 mph
Brakes:
Work via the transmission. Drums on rear wheels for parking only.
Wheel Base:
125 inches (Regular T's have a 100 inch wheel base)
Weight:
2,800 pounds
Wheels:
21 inch in front, 20 inch in rear, wooden spokes
Electrical System:
6-volt with magneto and generator to recharge battery, front and rear lights
Start System:
Electric starter motor
Features:
No winshield wiper, side windows or turn indicators. No speedometer, temperature or gas gauges, only a factory installed volt meter.
Additions:
Brake lights and mirrors have been added for safety. Motometer (Radiator cap mounted temperature gauge)
Production:
139,435 Ford Model TT's were built in 1924
Original Price:
$400 ($6,740 in today's money)
Status:
Driven frequently on and off museum property